RUSSELL KOUTROUBY ACUPUNCTURE PC

Acupuncture

 

How Acupuncture Changes but Continues to Remain the Same

Acupuncture has evolved for at least two millennia and it continues to grow in its value to our contemporary medicine.  Many models of how acupuncture affects the human body have been postulated over time.  Each set of theories became more sophisticated in their explanation of acupuncture’s  specific interrelationships between our body’s surface and the different anatomical and physiological functions known at the time.

The vast clinical experience that marks acupuncture’s success in treating  many conditions  has helped in the past  fifty years to modify those models and theories based on medical sciences current understanding of the  human being. 

All Roads lead to Rome

There are currently over 80 types of acupuncture practiced in China and 30 types practiced in Japan. Each culture, including the western cultures of  Europe, Australia and the United States have also added numerous types and styles of acupuncture practice.  The common features shared by all of these is using needles to make small  accurate entries  into the surface of the skin  ACU – PUNCTURES.  The needles  activate the bodies natural processes to  normalize homeostasis (balancing the rhythms of the body), allostasis ( the ability of the body to adapt to changes in the environment) and  to promote self healing.

Acupuncture is an Holistic Therapy

All systems of medicine can be practiced , more or less , holistically.   The diagnostic methods  used in acupuncture identify the patterns of both the symptoms of the disease and  the capacity of the patient to  return to health.  

Acupuncture Principles:

·         Restoration of physiological balance (homeostasis)

·        Maximizing  self  healing without  side  effects ( improve allostasis)

·        Treating both the root of the disease within the whole body and the symptoms of the disease.

How Acupuncture Works:

I encourage you to visit the link below: This article appeared in the Wall Street Journal on March 22, 2010 and includes two video feeds on receiving an acupuncture treatment.

Decoding  An Ancient Therapy